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ANTIQUE DECORATIVE ART

 

There are many examples of rare and atypical, fine antique Japanese textiles that have survived into the 21st century. Each of these extraordinary artworks tends to incorporate auspicious symbols and preserve for history an intriguing look into the world of the upper class Japanese in past centuries. These exceptional antique textile pieces include Mirror Covers, portions of Samurai Costumes, Boys Day Banners, Wedding Collars and others. Each is available to adapt to individual decorating styles; and everyone is an irreplaceable treasure.  (click on individual pictures for more information)
 

Wood Obi Hanger with Silk Tassels

Geisha on
sheer Silk (6411)

Ivory Chirimen Wedding Collar (6418)

Antique Horse Kalage (1215)

Antique Hand Painted & Signed Haori Pillow (6106)



Hand painted antique silk pillow (6101)

3 Woodblocks
(6472)

Antique Tomesode Kimono Pillow (6107)

Certified Chinese Porcelain Lion Dog

Antique HandWoven Treasure Ship Haori Pillow (6104)

Table Runner (M6402)

BoysDay Banners
BDB
(6201)

Legend of Izanami BDB (6205)

Empress Jingo Kogo BDB (6202)

Bronze Antique Water Dropper (W155)

1870s Botanical Woodblock (6471)

Antique Thai Hand Quilted Square (6470)

Antique Thai Hand Quilted Square (6465)

Antique Thai Hand Quilted Square (6467))

Antique Thailand    Quilted Square (6466)

Antique Thai Hand Quilted Square (6469)

 

1 A: Kashigata
Eggplant Sweets Mold

1 B: Kashigata
Open Fans Sweets Mold

1 C: Kashigata
Chrysanthemums Sweets Mol
d

 

1 D: Kashigata
Flying Crane Sweets Mold

A Boys Day Banner is a wonderful example of the heraldic expressions of Japanese Samurai families’ celebration of their young sons. The maternal Grandparents often commissioned this banner. It would include brilliant and glowering Samurai battle scenes, the family’s crest, and was signed by the artist commissioned to paint it. The banner would be hung outside the family home on a long pole during the famous Boys’ Day Festival which was first observed in the 6th century, and became an increasingly significant a Japanese Holiday It was intended to express the family’s wish that their son would grow up to be a strong, steadfast and courageous man. Typically Boys Day Banners are tall (up to 26 feet along) canvas-like, hand painted cotton banners meant to be hung vertically outdoors. Because of this, finding older fine examples of this artistic expression is very difficult.

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Inventory last update 6/9/17
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